Resurfacing

As Melbourne goes back into lockdown, we reach the end of a bruising semester. Many apologies to those who have asked me questions recently and got no answer. Please ask again if your problem is still outstanding, as I have lost track of who you are.

Much appreciation to those of you who are, or soon will be, training the next generation of practical petrologists over the internet – and also to those budding petrologists who are being trained!

I hope all of you and your folks are safe and well,

Eleanor

COVID-19 hiatus

Dear friends, colleagues, and all HPx-eos/THERMOCALC users,

There will be a hiatus in news, as, in common with the rest of the global community, we work to handle the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our professional and personal lives. I hope to return to website developments in June, after the end of semester.

Wishing all of you the very best at this difficult time,

Eleanor and the rest of the team

Testing the x-eos in small peridotitic systems

Corinne Frigo has been visiting Melbourne from ANU. Corinne is working with Hugh O’Neill, Richard Arculus and Eleanor on ARC Discovery Project DP170100982, A new perspective on melting in the Earth and the origin of basalts. She has some very interesting experimental results on peridotite melting in CMAS + Cr2O3 + K2O at 30 kbar, which contrast nicely with the experiments of Liu & O’Neill (2004) at 11 kbar.

At Tiamo in Lygon Street for breakfast – photo by Simon.

The experiments are giving the x-eos a workout! Currently, the model pyroxenes are taking too much Al2O3 in high-Cr2O3 bulk compositions, meaning that we should revise the Al-Cr partitioning here. Experiments in small systems are extremely useful, providing constraints that can’t be extracted from the natural system data available. Eleanor and Corinne will continue to look at this problem over the next few months, and their new insights will ultimately be incorporated into the next generation of igneous x-eos.

cpxwing log entry 001

Mushrooms and clinopyroxene –
a good combination?

This is Simon’s blog reporting on the development of a new single-clinopyroxene HPx-EOS.

The new model is designed to replace pre-existing versions that do not currently overlap in P—T—x space.

So far three clinopyroxene EOS exist. Ordered diopside—omphacite—jadeite (Green et al., 2007) is for coexisting sodic—calcic clinopyroxenes. It accounts for order—disorder on the octahedral M1 and M2 sites, but not on the tetrahedral T sites. It is appropriate for high pressure but unsuitable for high temperatures.

Continue reading “cpxwing log entry 001”

Modelling experiments at ANU

Eleanor has been at the Australian National University in Canberra visiting Corinne Frigo. Corinne has recently begun a complex program of experiments on the generation of basalt-analogue melts in the CMAS±Cr system. The new igneous set of HPx-eos do not agree too well with Corinne’s initial experiments. This is not really a surprise at this stage, but we have some work to do before we can understand what is wrong.

Corinne is working with Hugh O’Neill, Richard Arculus and Eleanor on ARC Discovery Project DP170100982, A new perspective on melting in the Earth and the origin of basalts. In this project we have the opportunity for close interaction between the experimental program and the internally-consistent modelling work. Enlightening and fun! Corinne will present some of this work at Goldschmidt on 21st August.

Sunset in Australia’s Bush Capital.
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POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19HPx-eos modelling workshopTrieste, Italy

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